Wednesday, 21 September 2016

Going Tribal - Maori!



28mm metal Maori from Eureka Miniatures that I painted recently, although I think there may be an Empress figure in there too.














20 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Glad you like them Michał - from an Australian company too :-)

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  2. Mate! They look brilliant! (I'm guessing they're a commission?)

    By the way, they're Maori, not Maoris - Te Reo (the Maori language) doesn't add an s for plurals. One Maori, many Maori. One kiwi, many kiwi. Etc.

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    Replies
    1. Hey bro! Yep, a commission. Glad as a Kiwi that you approve :-)
      Thanks for the tip about the syntax, I shall endeavour to adjust it.

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    2. Oh, and that pounamu mere (the greenstone club) in the third to last picture is bent! :-)

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    3. Oh, OK, it came like that to me - just checked Eureka website, once again you are correct!
      Give that man a gold star :-)

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  3. Very nice Maori indeed! In fact I think I know some of them!!

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    Replies
    1. Hehe, cheeky bloke! Thanks Rodger :-)

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  4. Very nice miniatures and great paint work :)

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  5. I am impressed with the range of body-types among these fellows. The greenstone patu, or mere would have been a pretty prestigious weapon, the greenstone (pounamu) being fairly rare and highly valued. Patu were also made from stone, wood, bone, even iron, apparently. There were other patu designs that gave the weapons slightly diffent characteristics.
    These weapons are often thought of as clubs - concussive weapons. They could be so used, I guess, but the sharpened top edge made the weapon cognate to a short sword. As Maori weren't armoured beyond whatever cloaks they wore, I imagine such things would leave very nasty wounds. The axe-like thing being waved about was called a tewha tewha. One end was sharpened to a point, the other sharpened like an axe. I have always been impressed by its shape, not far different from a musket with a bayonet. I imagine it would have been used very much like a musket as a close-quarter weapon: like a quarterstaff, spear and/or axe.


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    1. Very informative indeed Archduke, thankyou.

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  6. Kapai! Excleent paint-jobs. Very expressive figures. I've been meaning to get some to add to my existing Empress colonial NZ Wars project.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks! Yes, there's a nice variety in the range.

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  7. Replies
    1. Thanks so much James, I really appreciate the encouragement.

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